Jun 282016
 

Did you know that during the 6 day siege at Fort Mifflin the 400 American’s inside the fort had only 10 cannon to defend against the British with 2000 troops, a fleet of ships, and 228 cannon?  It was a cold and wet November in 1777 at Fort Mifflin (Named after General Thomas Mifflin), a wood and stone structure located nine miles from center city Philadelphia, on a muddy island in the Delaware River. What happened here may well have changed American history. But few people are aware of it.

Join us on Monday, April 10th as we welcome Elizabeth Beatty, executive director of the National Historic Landmark Fort Mifflin.

Our lectures have proved to be very popular and we strongly recommend that you book your seat now. 

Register NOW

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The all inclusive admission price is $49 per person which includes the 18th century American Fare Buffet, all soft beverages and coffee, family style sweets during the question and answer session, all tax and gratuities, the lecture, and a donation to help support the Paoli Battlefield Historical Park.

Your admission also includes a raffle ticket for a chance to win a night’s stay at the General Warren Inne. There will be one winner drawn at each lecture.

ftmifflin

Ariel View of Fort Mifflin

In 1777 (from November 10th to the 15th), British troops bombarded the 22-acre fort with more than 10,000 cannon balls, eventually destroying the structure.

Inside the fort, a cold, wet and hungry garrison of 400 men suffered 240 casualties in the effort. So short were the Americans on ammunition that anyone retrieving a cannonball that could be fired back was promised a gill of rum — about four ounces.

The weather hurt the Continental soldiers in another critical way. With unusually heavy rains flooding the back channel, two British ships were able to sail up the channel and bombard the fort’s only unfinished walls at point-blank range. British Marines even climbed up to the crow’s nest of the HMS Vigilant and threw hand grenades at soldiers inside the fort.

With the fort walls collapsing around them from the incredible shelling, most of the Americans evacuated after nightfall on November 15th, rowing with muffled oars across the river to nearby Fort Mercer (now part of Redbank Battlefield Park, Gloucester, New Jersey).

The 40 men remaining at Fort Mifflin set fire to what was left of the structure, and then joined their comrades. But they left the fort’s flag flying, and they never surrendered.

Sinking of the HMS Agusta

Sinking of the HMS Agusta

Biggest Boom: The explosion of the 64-gun HMS Augusta in the Delaware River in October 1777 after running aground and being fired on by Americans at Fort Mifflin and Fort Mercer. Author Tom Paine, of “Common Sense” fame, who was on the road between Germantown and Whitemarsh, wrote to Ben Franklin that the sound was “like the peal of a hundred cannon at once.” The Augusta was the largest ship ever lost by the British to the Americans in two wars.

What they accomplished: The troops at Fort Mifflin bottled up 250 British ships in the Delaware River for about six weeks, destroying several — and preventing food, clothing, gunpowder and munitions from reaching the British army in Philadelphia.

By holding “to the last extremity,” as General George Washington had ordered, the men at Fort Mifflin gave Washington time to move his exhausted troops to Valley Forge for the winter — and very possibly saved the country.

After the war, Fort Mifflin was rebuilt. It served as a prison during the Civil War, and a naval munitions depot during World War I and II. Beth Beatty, who became executive director in 2010, views the fort as a veteran who has served and sacrificed for the country over an extended period of time.

 

For donations to Fort Mifflin, or to volunteer, go to: www.FortMifflin.us, or call 215-685-4167.

Jun 212016
 

Celebrate the spirit of the American Revolution as we proudly welcome Charlie Zahm to the General Warren Inne for “An Evening of Colonial Music” on Tuesday, July 19th, 2016.

Year after year, Charlie Zahm’s voice, musicianship, extensive musical repertoire, and stage presence make him one of the most popular performers at festivals, music events, house concerts, and many other venues.  Charlie Zahm brings the spirit of the American Revolution and the drama of the age to an audience like few musicians can. Whether he is singing the glories of gallant General Washington, an ode to the great new ideal of “Liberty,” songs of battles won or lost, or just popular selections of the times, Charlie calls on a robust baritone, mastery of guitar (and other instruments), and a seasoned approach to the art of “entertaining” to provide a program enjoyed by all.

Our lectures have proved to be very popular and we strongly recommend that you book your seat now. 

Click here to go to the booking page.

Dine on heavy hors d’oeuvres in the outdoor Terrace (weather permitting) and relax and enjoy the sounds of ballads from days gone by.  This special summer soiree is easy on the purse at $39 per person, Alcoholic drinks are extra.  Included in your fee is all soft beverages and coffee, all tax and gratuities, the program, and a donation to help support the Paoli Battlefield Historical Park.

Your admission also includes a raffle ticket for a chance to win a night’s stay at the General Warren Inne. There will be one winner drawn at each lecture.

Charlie Zahm

Courtesy of charliezahm.com

While Charlie is one of the most popular and sought out soloists at Celtic music festivals, maritime, early American and hymn music events anywhere east of the Mississippi., one of his great passions is singing about our Founding; the struggle of men and women who sacrificed all-their lives, fortunes and sacred honor (as Jefferson wrote)-to create a sovereign new land based upon principles of law, governance, and freedom that had long been denied them.

Charlie’s strength in the study and interpretation of history (in fact, one of his University degrees is History) has led him through a life-long disciplined research of the period, and how it affected the body of music now so important to its understanding. But Charlie’s presentations are no lectures-but rather fun, interactive and powerful events that truly provide a window to the past through time-honored oral traditions of recitation and song.

Whether singing at an outdoor festival, a historic site (such as Philadelphia’s Independence Hall), a concert or convention, Charlie demonstrates that his vocal ability is rarely matched inside or outside traditional music, and his mastery of the guitar is the perfect complement to his vocal performance. Whether singing a great old forgotten period song or some rousing well-known sing-along from the Early Days of the Republic, in shows ranging from Philadelphia’s Olde City to the giant Spectrum, Charlie entertains with a great respect for both his audience and his chosen material.  You can keep up with Charlie Zahm by going to his website http://www.charliezahm.com/

 

 

 

ppbf lecture series

Click here to view all of our July 2015-July 2016 Lecture Series

The Great Divide: the Conflict Between Washington and Jefferson that Defined a Nation.

 

For More detailed information Click Here.

Each attendee will be entered in a drawing for a free night’s stay at the General Warren Inne.

Our lectures have proved to be very popular and we strongly recommend that you book your seat now

Apr 052015
 

With enlistments declining, what could be done to boost the ranks of the Continental Army?   General James Mitchell Varnum had an intriguing idea, why not enlist African Americans into the fight for independence.

Join us on Monday, September 21st as we welcome back our friend Joe Becton as he talks about the 1st Rhode Island Regiment and the struggles of the African American soldiers during the American Revolutionary War.

Joe Becton is a teacher, philosopher, counselor, historian, musician, interpreter, husband, father, and grandfather.  He holds a bachelor’s degree in History Education from the University of West Florida.  Joe has been a Marine, Park Ranger Supervisor at Independence Hall, counselor, teacher, and Director of Visitor Services at Fort Mifflin.  Joe is also the leader of the Cobalt Blues Band and can be seen at many festivals in the area whether playing music or giving lectures.  Please visit his site at http://www.jobecton.com/index.htm

Our lectures have proved to be very popular and we strongly recommend that you book your seat now. 
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The all inclusive admission price is $49 per person which includes the 18th century American Fare Buffet, all soft beverages and coffee, family style sweets during the question and answer session, all tax and gratuities, the lecture, and a donation to help support the Paoli Battlefield Historical Park.

Your admission also includes a raffle ticket for a chance to win a night’s stay at the General Warren Inne. There will be one winner drawn at each lecture.

George Washington neither approved or disapproved of the idea of enlisting slaves and sent it to the Rhode Island Assembly to approve which they did on February 14th, 1778.  Learn about America’s first regiment that had several companies of African American soldiers, The 1st Rhode Island Regiment

Soldiers_at_the_siege_of_Yorktown_(1781),_by_Jean-Baptiste-Antoine_DeVerger

American soldiers at the siege of Yorktown, by Jean-Baptiste-Antoine DeVerger, watercolor, 1781

The 1st Rhode Island Regiment was a Continental Army regiment from Rhode Island.  Like most regiments of the Continental Army, the unit went through several incarnations and name changes. It became well known as the “Black Regiment” because, for a time, it had several companies of African American soldiers. It is regarded as the first African-American military regiment, despite the fact that its ranks were not exclusively African-American.

A total of 88 slaves enlisted in the regiment over the next four months, as well as some free African American men. The regiment eventually totaled about 225 men; probably fewer than 140 of these were African Americans. The 1st Rhode Island Regiment became the only regiment of the Continental Army to have segregated companies of black soldiers. (Other regiments that allowed black men to enlist were integrated.) The enlistment of slaves had been controversial, and after June 1778, no more non-white men were enlisted. The unit continued to be known as the “Black Regiment” even though only white men were thereafter recruited into the regiment to replace losses, a process which eventually made the regiment an integrated unit.

Under Colonel Greene, the regiment fought in the Battle of Rhode Island in August 1778. The regiment played a fairly minor—but praised—role in the battle, suffering three killed, nine wounded, and eleven missing.

Like most of the Main Army, the regiment saw little action over the next few years, since the focus of the war had shifted to the south. In 1781, Greene and several of his black soldiers were killed in a skirmish with Loyalists. Greene’s body was mutilated by the Loyalists, apparently as punishment for having led black soldiers against them.

 

ppbf lecture series

Click here to view all of our July 2015-July 2016 Lecture Series

 

Mar 032015
 

Who designed the Great Seal of the United States of America?  Who was the ONLY Secretary of the Continental Congress for it’s entire 15 years?  Who stands to the right of John Hancock on the painting of the Declaration of Independence on the 2 dollar bill?  Who’s name besides John Hancock was on the Dunlap Broadside, a copy of the Declaration of Independence printed on the night of July 4th and the only public version for the next 6 months?  Who notified George Washington of becoming our first elected President at Mount Vernon?  Charles Thomson, that’s who.

Join us on Monday, November 9th, 2015 as Bruce Gill the Executive Director and Curator of the Harriton Association, introduces us once again to this forgotten founding father.

Although few people today have heard of Charles Thomson (1729-1824), he was one of America’s most significant and influential Founding Fathers. Before the Constitution took effect in 1789, the Continental Congress was both the Executive and the Legislature. There was no President of the United States, only a President of Congress (elected by Congress). Thomson’s job combined what are now the domestic duties of the Department of State, the duties of the Secretary of the Senate. and the Clerk of the House of Representatives

Our lectures have proved to be very popular and we strongly recommend that you book your seat now.
Register NOW

Click here to go to the booking page

The all inclusive admission price is $49 per person which includes the 18th century American Fare Buffet, all soft beverages and coffee, family style sweets during the question and answer session, all tax and gratuities, the lecture, and a donation to help support the Paoli Battlefield Historical Park.

Your admission also includes a raffle ticket for a chance to win a night’s stay at the General Warren Inne. There will be one winner drawn at each lecture.

As the only Secretary of the Continental Congress for its entire fifteen years, Thomson was a tremendous unifying factor. He kept the minutes of all sessions of Congress, including special minutes of all the secret affairs. His journals and files became the archives of our nation. Among his many accomplishments as Secretary, Thomson designed the Great Seal of the United States. The United States of America continues to use the Great Seal on all of its official documents, and anyone can easily locate the Great Seal on the reverse side of the one dollar bill.

CharlesThomson

“CharlesThomson” by Joseph Wright (1756-1793)

Charles Thomson traveled to Mt Vernon in April, 1789, to inform George Washington that he had just been elected first President of the United States under the new Constitution. By July, Thomson was retired from Congress, having submitted his resignation to President Washington and having turned over the Great Seal of the United States to him.

As Secretary, Thomson’s name was regarded as an emblem of truth. In all the factional disputes of the Revolutionary period, his judgment was respected. During the rumors and uncertainties of the Revolutionary War, Thomson helped the Continental Congress retain the faith and support of the people by insisting that full and honest reports be issued, under his signature, concerning all battles and engagements whether won or lost.  Ranked closely to the President, Thomson stands to the right of John Hancock in the painting of the Declaration of Independence seen on the two-dollar bill. In fact, Hancock’s and Thomson’s are the only two names on the Dunlap broadside, the copy of the Declaration printed the night of July 4th – the only version made public for the next six months

Charles with his wife Hannah retired to Harriton House (which still stands today in Bryn Mawr, PA (http://www.harritonhouse.org/). Thomson originally acquired the house and estate through his marriage to Richard Harrison’s daughter, Hannah Harrison, in 1774. In 1789, after serving 15 years as the Secretary of the Continental and Confederation Congresses, Charles Thomson and his wife Hannah retired to Harriton House, where he remained until his death in 1824.

Charles Thomson pursued two major interests in his retirement at Harriton. The first was scientific agriculture, which was America’s principal ‘industry’ immediately following the Revolution. Thomson had had a long-standing interest in scientific agriculture. In 1785, while still serving as Secretary, Thomson helped to found the Philadelphia Society for Promoting Agriculture, which survives today as the oldest continuing agricultural organization in the country. He had also written a pamphlet, published by the American Philosophical Society in the same year, entitled Notes on Farming. While at Harriton, Thomson experimented with new agricultural techniques and crop production. He was also an avid beekeeper. Perhaps most importantly, Thomson was an ardent abolitionist who managed his farm with paid labor and by letting his land on shares with his workers. He had a continuing correspondence with his old friend Thomas Jefferson, and in a letter to Jefferson, Thomson argued that slavery was like a cancer on this great new country which would come to bloodshed if it could not be resolved by religion, philosophy, or reason.

Charles Thomson’s second major interest in retirement was to return to his classical studies. While at Harriton, he translated the Bible from ancient Greek texts into English. The Bible was printed in Philadelphia in 1808 by a woman printer named Jane Aitken. The four-volume work was the first translation of the Bible from Greek texts on the North American Continent.

 

ppbf lecture series

Click here to view all of our July 2015-July 2016 Lecture Series

 

Washington and Lafayette – The Friendship That Saved The Revolution

 

For more detailed information Click Here

Each attendee will be entered into a drawing for a free night’s stay at the General Warren Inne.

Our lectures have proved to be very popular and we strongly recommend that you book your seat now

An Evening With His Excellency, General George Washington

 
Carl Closs as Washington

For more detailed information Click here.

We would like to Thank Zeyn Uzman for sponsoring this event.

Each Attendee will be entered in a drawing for a free night’s stay at the General Warren Inne.

Our lectures have proved to be very popular and we strongly recommend that you book your seat now

Jun 292014
 

Renowned George Washington “living biographer” Carl Closs visits us on Tuesday, July 29th for “An Evening With His Excellency, General George Washington”.  The General will mingle with guests while all enjoy a special one hour cocktail and hors d’oeuvres reception in the outdoor Terrace and then speaking to his guests about the Declaration of Independence and the Constitution and responding to their questions and comments.  This special summer soiree is easy on the purse at $39 per person, Alcoholic drinks are extra.

Our lectures have proved to be very popular and we strongly recommend that you book your seat now

Click here to go to the booking page.

 

Your admission also includes a raffle ticket for a chance to win a night’s stay at the General Warren Inne. There will be one winner drawn at each lecture.

George Washington’s Presidency (1789-1797) set the gold standard for what it means to be the President of the United States of America. His impact on our country, and the world, is so immense that it has been the subject of thousands of books, movies and Doctoral dissertations. Washington’s selflessness, sound judgment, moderation and “steady hand at the wheel” allowed our fragile Republic to rise to greatness in the decades that followed- and become a beacon of liberty for people around the globe. Abigail Adams summed it up when she wrote: “Mark his majestic fabric, he’s a temple sacred by birth, and built by hands divine. He is polite with dignity, affable without familiarity, distant without haughtiness, grave without austerity, modest, wise and good.” His biography is well known but still some myths remain to this day.

Carl is a former educator and senior business executive who has dedicated his retirement toward helping children and adults discover George Washington. His portrayal goes much deeper than simply donning a uniform, Carl is a serious scholar and lively speaker who delights audiences with little-known, instructive and entertaining Washington facts that parallel the challenges and situations we face today in our homes, classrooms and workplaces. Carl’s biography and testimonials speak to his world renowned status as one of the best “living biographers” of General George Washington.

For more information on Carl Closs go to http://www.gwashington.net.

We would like to thank Zeyn Uzman for sponsoring this event.

 

Jun 252014
 

Join us on Monday, September 8th as we kick off our 4th season of A Revolutionary Lecture Series at the General Warren Inne in Malvern.  We welcome local author Gene Pisasale to discuss Washington and Lafayette, The Friendship That Saved the Revolution. General George Washington (Carl Closs) will be there in uniform for this lecture.  

Our lectures have proved to be very popular and we strongly recommend that you book your seat now

Click here to go to the booking page

The all inclusive admission price is $49 per person which includes the 18th century American Fare Buffet, all soft beverages and coffee, family style sweets during the question and answer session, all tax and gratuities, the lecture, and a donation to help support the Paoli Battlefield Historical Park.

Your admission also includes a raffle ticket for a chance to win a night’s stay at the General Warren Inne. There will be one winner drawn at each lecture.

The lecture highlights the little known role that the Marquis de Lafayette played in America’s war for independence, including his participation at the Battle of the Brandywine on September 11, 1777. His ongoing support, both monetary and political, helped win the war against Great Britain and earns him recognition as a “Founding Son” of the Revolutionary War. The lecture series was inspired by a visit to Brandywine Battlefield Park- which along with other historic parks is in danger of being closed.

Gene has written many books including The Forgotten Star: A Historical fiction novel of the War of 1812 and true-life mysteries surrounding a 200-year old American icon- the Star-Spangled Banner, Abandoned Address- The Secret of Frick’s Lock, Lafayette’s Gold- The Lost Brandywine Treasure, Vineyard Days: a novel set in Martha’s Vineyard, and The Christian Sanderson Museum – Tom Thompson Remembers.

Gene is an historical mystery writer from the Main Line outside Philadelphia. An avid history buff, he started writing novels after 30 years in the energy and investment industry. He holds a Master’s Degree in Petroleum Geology and an MBA Finance. Gene is a member of the Chester County Historical Society, Chadds Ford Historical Society, American Friends of Lafayette, Friends of Brandywine Battlefield and is an approved speaker for the Delaware Humanities Forum. He has published five novels, conducts an ongoing lecture series on historical topics and is available for book signings. Gene and his wife Phyllis live in Kennett Square, Pennsylvania with their three cats Frankie, Francis and Momcat, parakeets Linus and Sally and occasional feline freeloaders Bear, Smoky and Dadcat.

For more information about Gene Pisasale visit www.genepisasale.com

 

 

Jun 152014
 

Join us on Monday, April 13th as we welcome renowned historian and writer Thomas Fleming as he presents his new book “The Great Divide: the Conflict Between Washington and Jefferson that Defined a Nation.”

Our lectures have proved to be very popular and we strongly recommend that you book your seat now

Register NOW

Click here to go to the booking page.

The all inclusive admission price is $49 per person which includes the 18th century American Fare Buffet, all soft beverages and coffee, family style sweets during the question and answer session, all tax and gratuities, the lecture, and a donation to help support the Paoli Battlefield Historical Park.

Your admission also includes a raffle ticket for a chance to win a night’s stay at the General Warren Inne. There will be one winner drawn at each lecture.

The book discusses how Jefferson disagreed violently with Washington’s approach to the presidency. He took particular issue with Washington’s view of the French Revolution, which Jefferson endorsed no matter how violent and amoral it became. In this context, Washington’s Farewell Address can be read as a rebuke to Jefferson and his followers.

Thomas Fleming is an historian and historical novelist, with a special interest in the American Revolution. He was born in 1927 in Jersey City, New Jersey, the son of a World War I hero who was a leader in Jersey City politics for three decades. Before her marriage, his mother, Katherine Dolan Fleming, was a teacher in the Jersey City Public School System.

After graduating from St. Peter’s Preparatory School in Jersey City, Fleming spent a year in the United States Navy. He received a Bachelor’s degree, with honors, from Fordham University in 1950. After brief stints as a newspaperman and magazine editor, he became a full-time writer in 1960. His first history book, Now We Are Enemies, an account of the Battle of Bunker Hill, was published that same year. It was an instant success, reviewed in more than 75 newspapers and featured as a main selection of the Literary Guild.

Since then, Fleming has published numerous books about events and figures of the Revolutionary era. He has also written about other periods of American history, and has published more than twenty novels, including several best-sellers, set against various historical backgrounds.

Tom has published Now We Are Enemies (1960)— the battle of Bunker Hill from both sides of the firing line, Beat The Last Drum (1963) — a panoramic account of the siege of Yorktown, the victory that won the Revolution, The Man From Monticello: An Intimate Biography of Thomas Jefferson (1969),   The Man Who Dared The Lightning (1971) — a biography of Benjamin Franklin, The Forgotten Victory (1974) — the story of the 1780 battle of Springfield, N.J.- a clash that could have ended the Revolutionary War in Britain’s favor, The First Stroke (1978) — the battles of Lexington and Concord, written for the National Park Service, Downright Fighting (1988)— the battle of Cowpens, written for the National Park Service,  Liberty! The American Revolution (1997) — the companion volume to the award-winning PBS television show of the same title, and Duel: Alexander Hamilton, Aaron Burr and the Future of America (1999) among the many, many books he has published

A frequent guest on C-Span, PBS, A&E and the History Channel, Fleming was a consultant and commentator on the PBS series, The Irish in America: Long Journey Home, and wrote the companion volume to another PBS series, Liberty: The American Revolution. He contributes articles to such magazines as American Heritage, Military History, History Today, and MHQ, the Quarterly Journal of Military History. He has served as president of the Society of American Historians and the PEN American Center. He also spent ten years as chairman of the New York American Revolution Round Table and is an Honorary Member of the New York State Society of the Cincinnati. Fleming lives in New York with his wife Alice, a distinguished writer of books for young people. The couple has four children and seven grandchildren.